Not Everyone You Lose Is A Loss

Not Everyone You Lose Is A Loss

To attain growth, evolution and unmatched success, one must venture beyond the familiar. They cannot be accomplished by clinging to the past, adhering to routine efforts, or taking the well-travelled route.

Everyone likes to win and hates to lose, but do these experiences really benefit us in the long run? This is a question that is frequently overlooked. Stated differently, does a gain or a loss always equal good or bad? Should we rejoice in every victory and grieve at every defeat? Do you know of any binary exceptions? Maybe these encounters have a more contradictory effect on our lives in certain cases. Yes, success frequently pays off, but failure may sometimes feel like a curse. Nonetheless, both may offer unspoken lessons and opportunities for development. Do they not? Gains can, in fact, be costly, and losses can sometimes present unanticipated benefits. That is entirely accurate. Do gains also cost us? Do losses also benefit us? Stay put. They actually do.
Ever felt or encountered someone, something, or a job that made you feel heavy or limited your goals? Have you ever felt stuck and choked in your current situation, wondering if it’s the right one for you? An individual’s life is shaped and mapped out in large part by the organization they work for, the people in their immediate environment, and the things they value most. Opting for an environment that is both stimulating and encouraging allows one to continue growing in accordance with their ability-driven objectives and dynamically changing surroundings. A portion of the gains must be given up for that. There’s a rationale for it.
To attain growth, evolution and unmatched success, one must venture beyond the familiar. They cannot be accomplished by clinging to the past, adhering to routine efforts, or taking the well-travelled route. Even though you are the most successful person among your peers right now, you won’t be able to stay that way if you cling to your success and oppose change. Would it not? Thus, clinging to some of the fleeting successes, persons, or objects frequently robs us of our full potential and enduring accomplishments.
In other words, striking a careful balance between change and stability necessitates quick thinking and decisive action. Stasis would seem to be the only viable outcome until we allow the changes to take over by releasing the things we cling to tightly. We cannot cling to the causes of both progress and stagnation at the same time. Each is priced similarly to the other. As a result, we must largely compromise one for the other.
For example, a buddy who shows you little value shows jealousy of your situation, or struggles because they don’t truly know you aren’t really your friend. Is it not? Isn’t it an advantage to break up with such people? You are not meant for the ones who are not yours. Do they? It isn’t really a loss when we part from the people, things, and roles that make us feel heavy. Rather, they are profitable losses. This would provide room for those who could potentially improve your life, wouldn’t it? You would have time and space to yourself to make friends, even if you don’t get one. I can relate to you on an emotional level. Yes, owning the self that is otherwise disowned. In the same vein, you deserve the people who deserve you. There would never be any limitations imposed by them. Being acknowledged for who you are and inspired to become who you deserve are two things that a true friend or well-wisher will undoubtedly bring to your life. Do they not?
The people and things we consider to be inevitable can occasionally be avoided. That is, they are frequently our fixations that we believe are essential to our existence. But typically, our obsessions rely only on them to survive. It’s important for us to differentiate between our obsessions and requirements. And no matter how magnificent this axis may be at the moment, our lives will spin around the axis of stagnation if we are unable to distinguish between our obsessions and the dynamic needs for growth and evolution.
Everything or everyone that depresses or discourages is a loss wrapped in a gain, thus in the short term, its absence would enable us to experience worthwhile, dynamic rewards. One is forced to choose between growth and gains that are already acquired in this situation. But development and progress require us to relinquish the things we cling to tightly and make room for objects, experiences, and social networks that are better and more novel to enter our lives.
The writer can be reached at [email protected]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.