KU framing policy to promote robust research culture

KU framing policy to promote robust research culture

Srinagar: To promote a robust research culture, the University of Kashmir has come up with a draft research policy with the University Research Council (URC) holding its maiden meeting recently.
In view of the non-availability of a comprehensive research policy at the valley’s premiere university, the draft research policy was framed by KU’ Dean Research in December last year.
It was placed before the URC, which held its first meeting on April 30 this year.
The draft research policy aims “to create and promote an enabling research ecosystem within which the faculty members, researchers and research students carry out their research”.
The activities related to research at KU, as per the draft policy, will be governed by a set of norms formulated by the URC.
Besides Vice Chancellor, the URC will have two distinguished researchers nominated by the Chancellor.
The research council will also have representatives from line departments including Science and Technology, Agriculture, Forests and Industries and Commerce besides Dean Research, Dean Academic Affairs and deans of the Faculties/schools.
The council will primarily advise the KU administration on matters related to improving the overall research environment.
Dean Research KU, Prof Zafar A Reshi, told Kashmir Reader that a need was felt by the university administration to have a parallel council on research maters on the pattern of the university council.
In its maiden meeting held on April 30, the URC primarily recommended adoption and implementation of the Research Policy, Prof Reshi informed.
He said that the URC also recommended the adoption of UGC regulations on incidents of plagiarism in the research work.
“Although the university has its own policy against plagiarism, but it was decided to implement the national level policy, which lays down severe punishment against the practice,” he added.
Among major proposals, the KU’s Research Council has considered the establishment of Centre for Advanced Instrumentation, and Centre for Interdisciplinary Research and Innovations (CIRI).
While the former will help in setting up high end instruments at KU, the latter will enable “patentable research work” at the varsity, Prof Reshi said.
The council also considered a proposal of the Directorate of Sports and Physical Education to undertake research work at the directorate.
Prof Reshi said that the council had no objections in recommending research at the directorate if it fulfills the UGC norms over the matter.
Other recommendations made by the KU’s Research Council include increasing the number and rate of research scholarships at the departments, keeping the overhead expenditure on a research project at 40 percent and consider the request of scholars pursuing Integrated M Phil and Ph D degrees to award points for the two degrees separately.