Achabal family seeks answers to son’s killing

Achabal family seeks answers to son’s killing

Anantnag: From a happy family, toiling together in their paddy field only two days ago, to obscurity, grief and mourning today, the fortunes of Mir family in Chek-Achabal, some 10 kilometers from Anantnag town, have dwindled in the blink of an eye while they have no clue of the circumstances that turned their world upside down.
Fayaz Ahmad Mir and Yasmeena’s eldest son, Nasir Ahmad Mir, was found shot dead Tuesday morning in an orchard, around a kilometer from the site of a gunfight, which had taken place on Monday.
The gunfight had concluded Monday evening with the killing of a Pakistani militant and an army major.
Oblivious to the ongoing gunfight, early Monday morning, the Mirs reached their paddy fields just outside their village and toiled through the afternoon. Tired and hungry the family asked Nasir to fetch tea from home, while they sat down to stretch their worn out legs.
Hours passed, the awaited tea did not arrive and there were no signs of Nasir as well. All that his parents got to lay their eyes on was his lifeless body, riddled with bullets, a day later.
“They are probably going to regret the decision of sending him to fetch tea for the rest of their lives,” a close relative of the Mir family told Kashmir Reader.
Fayaz, Yasmeena and other relatives ran from pillar to post through the evening and the night on Monday. “We searched for him throughout the night, intimated the police as well, but to no avail,” the relative said.
On Tuesday morning, some women from Bidoora, where the gunfight had taken place, intimated the family that Nasir’s body was lying in an orchard.
“He had bullet wounds in the chest.”
Protests rocked the area and thousands attended the funeral prayers. But now as hours pass by, it is only the immediate family who are left to mourn with unanswered questions.
“We have no clue what happened to him. Was he killed in cross fire or was it deliberate, only God knows. We hope we get some answers some day. It is hard to live with this ambiguity,” the relative said.
The police maintained that they were investigating the matter.
In Chek-Achabal, meanwhile, people describe Nasir as a humble, helping soul, who kept bees and studied as well.
“He was not the kind who would have indulged in stone pelting around the site of a gunfight. God knows how he was killed and by whom,” the locals said, adding that the whole area was tightly cordoned off by government forces throughout the day on Monday.