Polytechnic detains students for shortage despite attendance concession

Polytechnic detains students for shortage despite attendance concession

SRINAGAR: With the institution’s enrolled students absent from classes for months at a stretch, and many of them pursuing their academics elsewhere, a private polytechnic college in the Srinagar outskirts has detained dozens of them from appearing in the upcoming semester-end examinations.
Last Tuesday, Masterpro Institute of Technology, Nowgam, in Srinagar issued a notice to 108 students enrolled in different semesters, saying that they were “heedless to our previous notices floated through print and social media”.
The institute asked the students along with their parents “for the last time” to visit the college “so that special crash classes are managed for them”.
The notice said that the students’ names “will be forwarded to the Board for their detention” in case they failed to produce themselves.
Of the 108 summoned students, only around 30 of them have turned up at the college so far, while out of the remaining, 46 have already been detained, Mudassir Altaf Wani, Vice Principal Masterpro, told Kashmir Reader.
Wani said that the rest of the absconding students will also be detained and that they had talked to the Secretary Technical Education Department, which administers the polytechnic college.
He informed that the said students, enrolled in the 2nd, 4th and 6th semesters in different polytechnic branches, had been absent from their classes even as the session started in March this year.
“Initially, in the first week or so, their attendance was poor, but despite communication to them, they have not been turning up at all lately,” Wani said.
As per norms, only those students having a minimum attendance of 70 percent are eligible for their semester-end exams, but given the prevailing situation in Kashmir, Masterpro institute had fixed a minimum of 50 percent attendance as the eligibility, Wani told Kashmir Reader.
Still, most of the absent students have given their studies at the college a cold shoulder, he said.
Asked for the reasons why the students were not turning up, Wani said that many of them were likely enrolled for other academic courses, including classes 11 and 12.
“Some of them might be doing jobs actually, while they have taken admission here part-time,” he said.
“Others just hang around here and there. In fact, some parents asked us the other day why their wards did not have a 100 percent attendance as they leave for the college every day,” he added.
The college had detained a few students for poor attendance last year also, “but it is for the first time that we are detaining such a big number of students to give a message that it will not be tolerated”, Wani said.