The Spirit of Islam

The Spirit of Islam

The religion and faith of Islam, axiomatically and naturally, are dynamic. And each injunction that Muslims are enjoined to perform, it follows, is dynamic too. This would hold for fasting as well, which is in the nature of an obligation (fard) upon every healthy adult Muslim. But, in practice, we have reduced the dynamism of the practices that Islam enjoins to mere rituals and mere mechanics and this too, sometimes is just perfunctory. Consider an example. The real, dynamic and effective percolation of Ramadan into our selves would entail a total and comprehensive reorientation of our lives and selves to the ethical, spiritual and moral precepts and principles of Islam which should be reflected in our day today muaamilaat. But, alas and unfortunately, our day today dealings even in and during Ramadan do not reflect the Islamic and the Muslim ideal. The inference that can be drawn here is the obvious: our efforts in terms of faith and religion are half hearted; we are not totally serious and we are merely being performative in terms of the mechanics of the faith and religion. This is perhaps also reflected in the fact that soon after Ramadan whatever little effect remains, vanishes and dissipates quickly after the end of the holy month. Something is then fundamentally wrong somewhere. Ramadan and its ideal must induce a life transforming and spiritual dimension to our lives. It can only happen if and when if we honest toward it and imbibe its actual spirit and dynamism into the core tenor of our lives. A fundamental spiritual tension , so to speak must be the defining feature of our lives during and even after Ramadan. For all this to happen, we , as a society and individuals, must undertake collective introspection and review about our relationship with our faith and religion and practices thereof. The starting point of this review must be honesty , with ourselves and toward our faith and religion. In short and in sum, we must and have to adopt Islam as it is and not as we want to. This is a fundamental distinction that must be borne in mind. If we do adhere to this distinction, we will find our spiritual and ethical lives transformed for the good and the better in consonance with the spirit and ideal of Islam. We owe this to ourselves and our great religion and faith.