Maintain Ecological Balance

Maintain Ecological Balance
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Kashmir, a destination and place, known for its pristine beauty and abundance of nature, is in the midst of a severe ecological crisis. This crisis has been created by an imbalance which , in turn, accrues and emanates from rampant urbanization , demographic pressures and the attendant population growth, infrastructure growth and a rentier economy that views building and construction as the be all and end all of economic growth. What can be culled from these developments is that we, the people of Kashmir, tend to view the environment and ecological balance, in less than sanguine terms and , in the process, end up degrading it. This can be illustrated by a Kashmir based hotel’s lackadaisical approach toward compensatory plantation wherein it had been asked to plant saplings in lieu of the trees it had destroyed. But, over a period of time, these saplings, due to negligence have dried up. Similarly, illegal and unethical felling of Chinar trees, can be observed across Kashmir for the most trivial of reasons. Other innumerable instances can be cited to illustrate our collective and willful negligence and even destruction of our environment and ecology. This attitude of ours constitutes an irony, because in the ultimate analysis, we draw our sustenance from nature, which is God’s special gift to us. Be it Kashmir’s brand image of a pristine destination of nature and the thousands of people who derive livelihood out of the attendant trade, or the climactic stability that accrues from ecological balance , and other allied themes, all are threatened by our carelessness and negligence toward nature , the environment and the ecology. The day, if we do not course correct soon, might not be far off when the landscape in Kashmir could turn into a barren one with all allied ill effects that will accompany the depredation in social, economic, economic and climactic terms. The issue, at base, is conceptual and implicates all of us in negligence toward God’s bounty on us. It is that we do not see our nature as an extension of ourselves. We view it as something to be either exploited for personal gain or disregarded. This attitude and the orientation thereof must change for the larger good and for intergenerational reasons. We cannot and must not bequeath upon our Gen Next a Kashmir that is at odds with Kashmir and its nature and ecology as it was and has been.