Monetized Society

Monetized Society
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Our society, gradually and inexorably, has and is becoming wedded to money. This is alarming and potentially portends a drift that is insalubrious and carries ill effects for society. It amounts to stating the obvious that in modern societies and economies, money is important. It not only greases the wheels of the economy but confers a degree of material well being upon members of society. But, the problem begins when money becomes the end all and be all of everything, a condition that is increasingly defining our society. It would not be inaccurate to state that our society is becoming an overly monetized society in the sense that even social relations are determined by money. All this is not to suggest that money is not important; it is but money making must be legitimate , and proportionate. If and when money making becomes the ultima ratio in society, then all sorts of ills and problems creep into its social , moral and religious fabric. The problem gets aggravated in an economy like ours where the size, scope of the market and its linkages with other markets is limited and when our economy is a capital deficient one. Under these conditions, the size of the pie is limited. That is, only a limited amount of money can be made. But, if the desire to make money exceeds what can be legitimately made, then obviously it can only be made in illegitimate ways and means. Moreover, elevating money making to a fetish carries other prices and costs. It stands to reason to posit that money , how it is made and the extent to which it is valued has a proportional relationship with social order. If the equation or proportion gets disturbed, there then accrues a fundamental social disequilibrium which warps and disorients society. Money making , to repeat, is not inherently bad. But, it becomes so when it is fetishized and elevated over religious, moral and social concerns. The contemporary drift of our society suggests that many people do not get disturbed over the means of making money. As a result, many ills and evils have crept in. The day might not be far off when crime in Kashmir becomes prevalent precisely because money making has become the end of society. It is then in the nature of an imperative that we inject sobriety and proportion in our society and elevate moral , religious and ethical concerns over the lust for money.