Cheating Others Equals Cheating Oneself

Cheating Others Equals Cheating Oneself
  • 2
    Shares

Cheating is a sin and a crime. Our religion proscribes it in the strictest possible terms. But , yet cheating appears to be pretty prevalent here. Be it your reddiwallah, from who you buy your fruits or vegetables, the store owner from who you buy day today stuff, some students who cheat in their exams, some research scholars who plagiarizes, the motorist who jumps a queue, the clerk who demands a bribe and so on, instance galore can be cited about cheating in our society. From a psychological perspective, the cheater thinks that he or she is being smart by cutting corners and cheating, but actually , or in reality, he or she is cheating himself or herself. Consider an example. A student who cheats and gets away with it, that is, passes the exam in which he or she has cheated, will not go far. He or she may have rorted the process but time will catch up with him or her. Moreover, the fundamental nature and raison d’etre of exams is testing knowledge which actually leads to learning, intellectual growth and development but by cheating, the person doing it robs himself or herself of learning and intellectual growth. He or she regresses. This example can be grafted onto many situations in life but the general and the overall lesson and the moral holds. There then are individual costs associated with cheating. But, there are social costs too. Socially, if cheating becomes prevalent in society, its character becomes warped and even deformed with an attendant and allied cost on the value system and ethical orientation of that society. This cannot and should not be an end point that society should gyrate to. If the problem of cheating is extant in our society, it is recognizable and identifiable. Once identifiable, it should raise alarm bells and lead to introspection so that our moral , ethical and religious compass is aligned for the good. The reference here is to honesty and moral behavior, both for intrinsic reasons and in consonance with the tenets of our religion. The problem of cheating in our society is a grave one which must set us on the path of course correction and review. In the final analysis, honesty is not only the best policy but a supremely moral and religious duty. In the exam of life, we must all pass with flying colors. Let us then course correct and imbibe in ourselves the values of virtue, good character and honesty.