KU notifies MCQ paper pattern for even-numbered semesters

KU notifies MCQ paper pattern for even-numbered semesters
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SRINAGAR: Two weeks into its announcement, Kashmir University on Tuesday notified the pattern for the Multiple Choice Question (MCQ) based examination papers for the even-numbered semesters of undergraduate courses at the valley’s colleges.
A notification issued by the KU Controller Examinations said that the question paper pattern would be applicable for the Choice-Based Credit System (CBCS) semesters of the 2016 batch onwards.
It said that the question paper for even semesters – regular and backlog – at the colleges will have 60 MCQs and will be of as many minutes’ duration, meaning a minute per MCQ.
For odd-numbered semesters, the notification said that the question paper, of two hours’ duration, will be descriptive and will have three sections, A, B and C, having short, medium and long answer type questions respectively.
The notification said that there would be no change in the question papers of annual scheme and non-CBCS semester scheme batch 2015 and before.
The announcement of the introduction of the MCQ-based question papers for even semesters at valley colleges was made by the KU on March 2.
Asking the college students for their “full cooperation to make the new examination policy of the university a success”, the March 2 notification had warned, “Otherwise they (students) alone will have to suffer for delay in the examinations and result declaration, which will ultimately tell upon their craving for higher academic pursuits as no other university will wait for the declaration of their results beyond their academic schedule.”
The MCQ-based papers are expected to ease the burden of the examination workload on students and to enable the completion of UG courses in the stipulated time, which was even stretched to an extra year after the semester system and the CBCS were introduced at colleges in 2015 and 2016 respectively.
College teachers in the valley have, however, called the KU’s decision to introduce MCQs in colleges as “detrimental” and one which will “deteriorate the examination system”.