Frequent Breakdowns

Frequent Breakdowns
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It stands to reason to posit that productivity is a correlate of the general environment, infrastructure and facilities thereof. If this generic assertion holds, then the inference that can be drawn is that productivity in Kashmir plummets drastically, especially during winter. The reasons are manifold: one is, of course, the obvious: there is a gross infrastructure deficit in Kashmir. Despite this glaring deficit, our entrepreneurs and commercial establishments soldier on and do their best to eke out returns from an environment which is not business friendly. But, they can work and conduct their respective businesses only up to a point. Key here, again especially during winter, is uninterrupted supply of electricity. But, as is the wont, despite paying higher tariffs, commercial establishments in Kashmir suffer, on a whole host of fronts, of which electricity disruption could be the most severe and intense lacuna. Given this then, productivity takes a massive dip. From a basic economic perspective, productivity is related to both wages and, to some extent employment. If and when productivity dips, it impacts both and hence larger economic activity in Kashmir. Businesses and commercial establishments and our entrepreneurs then suffer badly and , in the process, economic activity, barring the bare minimum and subsistence sort gets impacted negatively. All this is in marked contrast to developed regions of the world where natural problems and issues that accrue from climactic conditions are anticipated well in advance and vigorous measures undertaken to make life and living conditions easy for people. But, none of this happens in Kashmir where adverse weather hits all walks and domains of life. This saga and the odysseys that people have to undergo , on account of negligence and omissions of assorted types and sorts has been going on for decades. Yet, there is neither pre emptive nor preventative action taken. In fact, infrastructural development in Kashmir lags behind demographic and structural trends. The “natural” victims of this are the people of the region. While holistic infrastructure development is a humungous task that will take vigorous and far reaction action, in the least, life should and must be made easier for entrepreneurs and commercial establishments here, given that there are obvious spill over effects, issues entailed from lack of electricity and other allied themes. These effects carry on over to other domains of life and people, to repeat suffer. This must be put to an end, the soonest.