Talent, Talent Everywhere But..

Talent, Talent Everywhere But..
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There is an axiomatic fact that needs to be told: talent has no color, creed nor caste nor any such attributes like these. Talent is talent. And, at the risk of sounding ethnocentric, Kashmir has and is defined by an abundance of talent. But, there is a sad and even tragic undertone to this: our raw talent usually goes waste. The reasons for the waste of talent in Kashmir are manifold. Primarily, there is under or no recognition of talent here in fields as varied and diverse as academic, intellectual, sport, culture, technology and so on. And, if, under the rarest of cases, talent is recognized, it is not utilized because of the obvious: there are hardly any opportunities. This means that talented people either exit the place, or worse, their talent goes waste. But, in terms of the former option, that is, exit, it is a very tiny proportion of the population that can actually leave the place for greener pastures; most have to bear the brunt of the waste of their respective talent(s) and suffer silently. The waste of talent in Kashmir, to iterate clichéd terms, constitutes both a tragedy and a travesty because God given abilities and capabilities are not put to use. The question then is: can the waste of talent be reversed? Can talent, raw and natural be put to good use? Possibly. But, for this to happen, we need talent spotters in diverse fields and domains. The primary talent spotter can be the immediate family of a child or a person. But, our society is structured in such a way that natural talent is snuffed out and killed here. Parents, for genuine reasons of financial and economic security of their children want them to follow tried and tested career paths. But, not all are meant to or can become engineers and doctors. Young people must be allowed to develop their innate talents and follow their hearts. This can be done if the incentive structures are altered by society and merely the conventional is disavowed in favor of the natural. Complementing this approach must be encouragement by society of the natural talents and inclinations of young people plus financial support for those who come from vulnerable and less privileged sections of society. In the ultimate analysis, natural talents are God’s gifts which must be nourished and nurtured; not snuffed. This is a duty we owe to our young and immensely talented people!