Months after Drug Control raid, unlicensed medical shops opening in Budgam’s Chewdara

Months after Drug Control raid, unlicensed medical shops opening in Budgam’s Chewdara

BUDGAM: Residents of Chewdara village in Budgam district are complaining that unlicensed medical shops are reopening in the area, a few months eeks after the Drug Control department sealed such shops in the area.
Residents alleged that two men, who used to run unlicensed medical shops that were sealed by the department, have come up with a fresh joint venture right outside a primary health centre.
“We fails to understand on what basis they are allowed to run this clinic again,” a resident said.
Another resident alleged that drug shops are run by quacks who have a role in promoting drug menace.
The residents said that people had appreciated the action of Drug Control department in the summer, when it sealed several clinics and medical shops in the area, after complaints from local populace.
“In our village, these shops are run by those persons whose activities have always remained worrisome for the whole area,” another resident said, wishing not to be named. All of them, he added, lack required qualification.
A student from the area said that senior citizens have time and again brought the issue to notice of the concerned department and Deputy Commissioner.
“We request worthy Governor Jammu and Kashmir to kindly intervene in this matter and save lives of common innocent people,” a group of residents added.
Drug Controller Division Beerwah, Syed Tanveer Ahmad, told Kashmir Reader that the illegally run shops were closed by the department months back.
“We have given them clear cut instructions not to open shops without licenses,” Tanveer said “Few of them have approached us for license but they don’t have diploma or degree in relevant filed, hence are not eligible.”
He however expressed helplessness about continuous monitoring of these shops.
“I am a lone person and don’t have any man force to keep watch on ground,” Tanveer said. “I had asked the police to keep vigil on these shops but they openly denied.”
Tanveer also clarified that under a provision in Drug Act (1940), an ineligible person can be a propertier of a medical shop provided a qualified person is hired to run the shop.
“If they can manage an expert or a degree/diploma holder, they will be allowed to run the stores,” Tanveer added.