On Medical Ethics

On Medical Ethics
  • 2
    Shares

Quacks are defined or described by the dictionary as those who profess knowledge and skill of medicine but, in reality, they possess neither. In recent days, quacks have been in the news and the administration has taken cognizance of these. In general quackery thrives in an environment or milieu where there is inadequate infrastructure of medical or public health facilities or where is there is general lack of awareness and knowledge about health and so on. While it is good that those practicing quackery have been brought into public notice and some action has been taken against them but there is a broader issue and theme that also needs to be attended. This pertains to the rather and somewhat inadequate attention given to patients by actual and real doctors. It is a statement of the obvious that in public hospitals, given demographics and the supply and demand of medical care, attending to all with meticulous care might not be entirely possible. While this, in itself, constitutes a travesty but the problem or the issue is more pronounced when it comes to doctors attending to patients in their private capacities. ( The reference here is to private practice). In this case, patients actually pay( sometimes through their nose which is a burden for the poorer segments of society) but the level and nature of attention and care, at times, is not adequate. From a pure commercial and business perspective, doctors an medics who indulge in private practice, wherever and whenever it is legal, are offering a service for which they are paid. They are doing no one a favor. Their practice is pure business but they must be scrupulous in delivering their services. But, at times, it has been observed that this is not the case. Some doctors are not only rude and insensitive to their patients but, at times, this indifference translates into behavioral issues percolating to what may be called bad or poor service quality. Since patients are generally at the receiving end, they cannot even dare to complain lest the doctor in contention refuses service or behaves indecorously. This serious issue needs immediate redressal and remedial action. In the final analysis, there might be no other recourse or remedial action than the conscience of doctors. They must remember that they have taken the Hippocratic oath and , in lieu, of this must be extra diligent and careful in dispensing and disbursing care.