Abominable Crime

Abominable Crime
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Negligence, willful, by design or default is also a form of corruption. But, in societies where corruption has almost been normalized, this form of corruption is ignored or elided. The reference here is the findings that suggest that expired medicines are either held in abeyance or, at times, sold over the counter even in government approved stores in hospitals. By pointing out to negligence, a hypothetical benefit of doubt is given to those who sell these medicines but it may be that some unscrupulous elements might be indulging in nefarious activities that are not only against public interest but also put the welfare and well being of people into jeopardy. If this holds and is true, then perhaps nothing can be more abominable than this. In effect, holding or selling expired drugs and medicines amounts to playing with the lives of people who are vulnerable and have no real choice but to buy and consume these. Generally speaking, one aspect of human nature is greed. All religions and ethical philosophies and practices abhor and disavow greed and hold it to be something that not only consumes and destroys an individual but society as well. This general point and observation can be held to be the explanatory factor for the hoarding and even selling of expired medications in Kashmir, even if this odious practice is done on account of sheer neglect. It must be immediately checked and stopped. The question is how? It stands to reason that this odious practice cannot be taken recourse to by one individual. There must and has to be a network involved. One obvious measure that strikes to mind here to check this menace is to break and smash these corrupt networks and dispense exemplary punishment to them. This must be followed by naming and shaming. Second, there must be regular surprise checks of medicine and medical stores. Third, the onus also falls on consumers to verify and check the manufacturing and expiry dates of medicines that they buy. Unfortunately, often times, in Kashmir, people do not bother about checking these. The checking and verification of manufacturing and expiry dates of medicines must become a reflex for people. In the final analysis, hoarding, holding and selling expired medicine is such a crime whose costs might not be evident immediately but the long term prices are both deleterious but also alarmingly dangerous. The menace then needs to be checked and brought to a halt with immediate effect!

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