Celebrate Eid Somberly and with Sobriety

Celebrate Eid Somberly and with Sobriety

The precariousness and fragility of life in Kashmir and the uncertainty thereof is underscored here pretty regularly. If nothing this should and must concentrate our minds as we bid farewell to Ramadan, 2018 and begin our welcome preparations for Eid al Fitr. The spirit of Ramadan, essentially, among other things a vigorous time for spiritual renewal, must be carried forward and through to our post Ramadan lives. From both a prosaic and a deeper perspective, Ramadan, an exacting regimen for a month, not only reorients Muslims to the Divine but also helps develop empathy and sympathy for the less fortunate and the vulnerable. The pangs of hunger and thirst that Muslims bear during the fasting period of Ramadan are meant, among other things, to alert them to the trials and tribulations of the poor. If self transcendence is among the goals of the spiritual regimens of Ramadan, then axiomatically, it should follow through rest of the year. The inference that can be made here is that the day of Eid al Fitr should and must not be a day of pomp and extravagance. In fact, Eid al Fitr, should be that auspicious and holy day when all of take recourse to vigorous and intense introspection over the month that has passed and when most of us have fasted and the future course of the year. Generally, speaking Ramadan, should not be viewed as a mere pause but a blessed month which should make us course correct and review. And, the summum bonum or focal point of all this must be Eid al Fitr. However, what is tended to be seen, in practice is, that on Eid al Fitr, most of us elide over and forget the austerity and simple lifestyles that we generally adhere to, in Ramadan and indulge in extravagant, conspicuous consumption. In this sense then, the great and Holy month of Ramadan, to repeat, becomes mere pause. This must change and the spirit of Ramadan must be not only reflected in how we celebrate Eid al Fitr and how we also comport and behave for the rest of the year. It should also mean sparing a thought for the poor and the vulnerable and actually ensuring, in thought, word and deed, that these people are cared for during Eid al Fitr. It is then incumbent on all of us, who fasted and prayed during the month of Ramadan not let the spirit of this Holy month lapse but also carry forward its message and spirit throughout the year. Celebrating Eid with sobriety and somberly would be a good start!