UDAY foundation offers to take care of abandoned babies

UDAY foundation offers to take care of abandoned babies

SRINAGAR: A New Delhi-based foundation has come forward to take care of two abandoned infants presently undergoing treatment at GB Pant Hospital, Srinagar.
UDAY Foundation that works in collaboration with Fortis hospitals- one of the premier medical institutions of India- wants to help the infants by providing them specialised medical care. These abandoned babies are presently admitted in the Neonatal Intensive Care unit of GB Pant hospital as they are suffering from neurological disorders.
Founder of UDAY foundation, Rahul Verma told Kashmir Reader, “Our priority is to provide proper medical treatment to the kids. Our volunteers in Kashmir have approached the hospital with the offer of any help they may need in treating the infants.” Rahul added, “No one has so far come forward to take custody of the children. We are confused about whom we should approach?”
Rahul wants the state government to come forward to help these kids. “Tomorrow, if we take these kids to Delhi for treatment, there are lot of formalities that need to be completed. Line of treatment needs to be discussed with someone either from the government or hospital administration.”
A baby girl was abandoned in GB Pant hospital on Saturday evening by veiled women, who left the baby unattended in ward no 2 of the hospital. Another infant undergoing treatment in the hospital for the last couple of weeks was brought here by Nowhatta police station. The baby was found on the stairs of Makhdoom Sahib shrine in Srinagar.
Dr Shafqat Khan, Medical Superintendent GB Pant Hospital said, “UDAY Foundation has offered us help. But as of now, we have not decided whether to send these children to SKIMS, Soura or Fortis.”
He said that the hospital was receiving calls from all over India. “People are ready to adopt the babies. A doctor from Mumbai has come forward to adopt the kids. But the final call on their custody has to be taken by the court. We are the temporary guardians and our priority is to get them treated in a better possible way.”