SMC’s waste-to-energy project delayed over PPA disagreement

SMC’s waste-to-energy project delayed over PPA disagreement

SRINAGAR: Differences over Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) between Jammu and Kashmir government and a company has delayed proposed project of converting waste into electrical energy in Srinagar city.
The project was proposed by National Green Tribunal (NGT) to Srinagar Municipal Corporation (SMC) almost a year ago to end the crisis of solid waste management in Srinagar city. The project was aimed at making sustainable solid waste management for the city at an affordable cost. However Spaak Bresson Private Limited, a company which was tendered to design, finance, build and operate the project, proposed a cost of energy that was not approved by the government.
SMC chief sanitation officer Manzoor Ahmad Turray told Kashmir Reader that the company proposed to charge Rs 8.9 per unit of energy that was ‘exorbitant’ for the Power Development Department (PDD).
“The plant will produce 4 to 5 megawatts of energy and the company has to run it for 25 years. As per the preliminary assessments made by the PDD, the company will make a profit of around Rs 800 crore which was too much. This disagreement has been there for the last six months,” Turray said. “The government has conveyed its concerns to the NGT, which will give its decision over the issue in coming days,” Turray added. Turray said the “much needed project would take at least two years for completion.“
“We cannot say anything about the project now. We don’t know when it will start because it entirely depends on the decision taken by NGT. The disagreement has delayed it further,” Turray said.
Presently SMC is managing the garbage by dumping it through scientific method at Achin. This process though reduced the earlier crisis to some extent, was neither sustainable nor affordable. One of its main flaws was that the SMC had to look for alternative land once the land got filled to capacity.
Asked if the plant had any environmental issues for the city, Turray said the emissions from the plant will be controlled and the ash produced during the process will also be treated.