Khush Khat catches eyeballs, youngsters offer verve to the dying art

Khush Khat catches eyeballs, youngsters offer verve to the dying art

SRINAGAR: At the weeklong Islamic calligraphy exhibition–Khush Khat, one of the artists – Nadiya Mir exhibited her calligraphy art she learnt by chance. Starting from a hobby, Nadiya never thought that she would fare well in the art to the level that people would start calling her as an artist. Hailing from Kralpora, Nadiya an economics postgraduate with a diploma in fashion designing is elated on her new found taste.
She says that the massive anti-India uprising in 2016 provided her a chance to concentrate on the art. She learnt the techniques of the art without any guidance.
“During the months of shutdown, I was thinking to decorate my room. The idea of Calligraphy stuck my mind. I started doing it. When I showed my work to others, they praised me and I started doing it more,” she said.
Nadiya continued to do Calligraphy as a hobby for months. When she uploaded pictures of her work on social media site, she got huge appreciations and orders from Shahid Rashid, a Kashmiri fashion designer.
“He (Shahid) liked my work and it motivated me to work harder. Then I started working more on myself by getting inspired by famous calligraphers to create best designs every time,” she said.


By decorating her work of Islamic Calligraphy with henna designs, she makes her frames appear more beautiful.
Nadia has mastered in using colours-black, golden, silver and bronze-to make the work more appealing.
For her, the art is about getting close to happiness, religion and God. She said, “When I draw Allah, I think more about Him and through this art I find solitude in remembering Him.”
Another young artist Ishfaq Ali Parray presented his work as contemporary calligraphy- fusion of calligraphy and painting.
Born in Zadibal area of Srinagar, Ishfaq was inspired by the art of Paper machie to which his family was associated for decades. He is deeply inspired by Kashmiri artist Masood Hussain.
After Graduating from Applied Arts from Institute of Music and Fine Arts, University of Kashmir, Parray has been doing Islamic calligraphy from six years and exhibited his art at many State and National events.
He has painted Quranic verses and famous poetic verses calligraphically by making use of dark colours.
“Doing calligraphy on canvas adds texture as it involves use of brushes instead of calligraphy pens,” he said.
He started doing contemporary calligraphy when he got a work from one of his masters. He said, “My master told me to make calligraphy which should look like painting. I too found it something different and started working on it more.”
He said that contemporary calligraphy demands more efforts and patience from an artist. “Making calligraphy with painting brushes is difficult for a calligrapher but an artist can do anything. It needs to have high control over brush and the thinking that it is pen instead of brush,” he said.
Ishfaq has seen good response and demand among people for his work. He said that the art of contemporary calligraphy is more famous in Iran and it is gaining popularity in Kashmir too.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.