Despite laid transfer norms, premature transfers continue in education dept

Despite laid transfer norms, premature transfers continue in education dept

SRINAGAR: Continuing its policy of premature transfers, the government transferred 53 principals, in-charge principals and assistant professors on Monday, many among them prematurely, flouting its own norms laid down in the government transfer policy.
As per the guidelines laid down in the transfer policy of 2010, an employee should spend at least two years at a specific position before being transferred to other place while the maximum term of stay at one place is three years.
The policy allows premature transfers only if it is in the interest of the public or administration, or when the employee underperforms or has health issues.
However, a source within the department told Kashmir Reader that the department has bluntly flouted transfer policy guidelines as per the wishes of senior officials and influential persons.
The source said that transfers are being done without considering the norms of transfer policy, and many times this is done because of political interference.
For instance, the source said, the principal of Government College of Education, now Institute of Advanced Studies in Education (IASE), Parveen Pandit, was transferred and placed as principal Sri Pratap College, even as she is yet to complete her minimum tenure period.
Similarly, principal Degree College Bemina Professor Yasmeen Ashaie and principal Degree College Ganderbal Professor Yasmeen Kawoosa were posted to their respective colleges in November 2015. But they were transferred to Amar Singh College and Bemina Degree College respectively a few months prior to the close of their minimum stay period.
Contrary to this, principal Government College for Women, M A Road, Professor Shaheen Altaf has even passed the maximum tenure period of three years and was to be transferred by the department along with 53 other persons.
“But at the eleventh hour, her transfer order was cancelled. It is only because she is the daughter of National Conference leader late Shiekh Nazir, and that’s the main reason she is continuing with her own choice of place without anyone daring to raise finger against her,” this correspondent was told. Altaf took over as GCW principal in March 2014 and was eligible for transfer by March 2017 at latest. It is not the first time that officials were reported to have flouted norms, but a high number of premature transfers have been ordered by the department during the last three years, while the transfers of several others have been shelved due to outside pressure.
A day before schools opened in the Valley after winter vacations ended onMarch 1, the government ordered over a massive 6,000 transfers through a 343-page order, probably the longest in the department’s history. Many of those transferred had been in their posts for less than a year.
The order created chaos in the department, and several harried teachers rushed to the Directorate of School Education, Kashmir, to protest the selective treatment in transfers carried out while flouting transfer policy norms.
In June 2016, the government, in a written reply to a question in the State Assembly, had justified the frequent transfers by calling them “unavoidable” and in the “interest of the administration”.
“These transfers are ordered with prior approval of the competent authority. This is provided under the Transfer Policy,” the government had said.
One of the transferred principals, wishing anonymity, says that both the department as well “external elements” have been exploiting the term “in the interest of the administration”.
“One could have approached court for a stay on the (transfer) orders, but when they mention ‘in the interest of the administration’ in the order notification, one is left with no choice but to kneel before the government diktat,” said the principal.
Minster for education Mohammad Altaf Bukhari and commissioner secretary higher education Asgar Samoon were not available for comment.

 

 

 

 

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