Patients brave shutdown challenges to meet medical appointments

Patients brave shutdown challenges to meet medical appointments

SRINAGAR: On Tuesday when three civilians and a combatant were killed by the government forces at Chadoora in Budgam, Haleem (name changed), a resident of Hanjora near Chadoora, had to collect her diagnostic reports, prior to an angiography scheduled at SMHS hospital for Wednesday.
However, as the gunfight culminated into civilian killings, Haleem could not collect the reports.
“All private labs including the one where we had conducted the examination were shut,” Ghulam Ahmad, Haleem’s husband said. “Since the angiography was important because we were waiting since Feb 9, we decided to leave for the hospital at 6 am without any reports.” The two took a longer route to reach Srinagar, but at the hospital, doctors refused to operate without the diagnostic reports. They were asked to take another date, for the month of May.
“I don’t think I could wait so long, because it meant to wait for my wife dying,” Ahmad said adding that doctors told agreed to go ahead with the angiography if he could somehow get the reports.
So Ahmad decided to go for new tests. Getting tests done at the hospital was not feasible as they do not provide instant reports. So he went outside the hospital, and found a private.
“At Budgam, I was charged Rs 800. In the city for the same tests I was charged Rs 1600. I was in desperation. I paid and got the tests done,” he said.
Lke Haleem, Farooq a resident of Kulgam, in south Kashmir, had to undergo an angiography on Wednesday. Because of the shutdown, he too left home at 6am, and reached the hospital at around 10am. He also hd been unable to get the test reports and like Haleem got it done outside the hospital at “double rates”.
However, between his home and the hospital, they had a tough time because of the shutdown.
“At Pampore our car was attacked by stones. It broke its panes. One stone hit my head but fortunately it did not injure me. At Rawalpora we had to negotiate with angry youth who only let us go when they checked my medial prescriptions,” Ali, Farooq’s father told Kashmir Reader.
However, the efforts of the two bore fruit as the doctors conducted their angiography in the afternoon.
Farooq’s report was fine, while Haleema was diagnosed with some problems.
After the tests, the two families were struggling how to reach home as no-one was ready to ferry them home.
Farooq, however, managed to secure night stay at relatives’ places, while Haleem’s husband was still trying to convince a taxi driver.

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