Students trained at community schools ready for exams

Students trained at community schools ready for exams

SRINAGAR: A few community schools started in old Srinagar as an alternative means of education–as all educational institutions have remained closed since the anti-India uprising erupted on July 9–have completed the syllabi and readied the students for the annual Class 10 and Class 12 examinations.
On September 23, the state government announced it will conduct Class 10 and 12 Board examinations from November 13 and November 14, respectively, a decision that has drawn flak from students and parents who have read it as a measure to counter the protest programmes of the resistance.
As many as 700 students have studied at many such schools in Rainawari and Khanyar areas. Volunteer teachers have been teaching students from Class 1 to Class 12 in mosques, homes, libraries and community halls.
At Rainawari, classes have also been held for Bsc, BA and BCom students.
Khalid Abbas, one of the main founders of the schools at Rainawari, told Kashmir Reader that Class 10 students have completed 90 per cent of their syllabus and Class 12 students 70 per cent.
“The Class 10 students are ready. In the next 15 days when their entire syllabus would be complete, we would start revision and tests. In coming days we will attempt to cover the rest of the Class 12 syllabus and start revision and mock tests as well,” Khalid said.
The volunteers had constructed a system to manage the centres. Graduates taught students of classes 1-5 and post-graduates taught students of classes 6-10.
Among the 50 volunteer teachers, there are four serving professors and the principal of a government degree college. The professors teach science, commerce and arts to students of Class 11 and 12, and to graduate students.
The students at the two centres are from various schools, including prominent ones like Biscoe and Burnhall. Many students come from other districts also. Classes start at 9am and last till evening.
Faiza, a Class 10 student and resident of Nawa Kadal, told Kashmir Reader that she had heard of the centre from her relatives in the area. She shifted to the relative’s house so that she could join the tuitions regularly.
“In coming days my syllabus would be complete. I would have no problems to sit in the exams. It was a good learning experience. Here different teachers taught different classes. In our school one teacher teaches more than one subject,” said Faiza, who is a topper in her school and had never attended tuitions before.

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