Hapless KU students are victims of callous evaluation

Hapless KU students are victims of callous evaluation

Srinagar: Hundreds of aggrieved students have lined up for re-evaluation of their papers after the Kashmir University declared results of various undergraduate courses. The students complain that the faulty evaluation system has ruined their careers and subjected them to unspeakable agony.
Waseem (not original name) is a mathematics student from Anantnag who is regularly showing up at the Examination Block of the University since his result was declared last month. He calls himself as victim of evaluators’ negligence. Waseem was declared ‘failed’ in one subject in his final year examination. Shocked by the unexpected result, Waseem obtained Xerox of his answer book after filing an RTI application. He was stunned to find one answer carrying 30 marks completely unevaluated. Had the answer been evaluated and the marks added to his total, he would have easily qualified.
The answer sheet, a copy of which is with the Kashmir Reader, has not been thoroughly evaluated. “Few questions have been cursorily evaluated. It seems the evaluator has only flipped pages and not applied his mind,” a University professor said on seeing the answer sheet.
Aisha (name changed), a chemistry student who had scored 90 percent and 82 percent marks in 10th and 12th respectively, was also declared failed in her final year examination after few questions were left unevaluated. She cruised through the exams after a gruelling exercise of re-evaluation.
Narrating her ordeal, Aisha said that she had been given 34 marks in chemistry subject in her final year exams and was selected for PG programme at Kashmir University. “After I applied for re-evaluation, the marks were incremented to 64. This was unbelievable,” she said.
There are many students who missed the opportunity to appear for PG entrance test due to faulty evaluation.
Another KU professor, who does not wish to be identified, said that the examination and evaluation system of the University is in a total mess. “There is total mess coupled with rampant corruption and nepotism in the university. This has lowered the standards of evaluation to worst levels,” he said.
A high-rank official at the University told Kashmir Reader that distribution of answer books for evaluation is a big racket. “For some people here, the evaluation means a business. They want to acquire more answer booklets to earn extra buck,” he said.
A professor who has witnessed the ordeal of the victims of faulty evaluation said that many evaluators do not even look at the answer books. “I have seen answer books where few questions have been either left unevaluated or the marks of some questions were not counted to the aggregate total. The students ultimately end-up with re-appears,” he said.
“If evaluators are handed-over 5000 to 8000 answer booklets, how is it possible that they finish it within the stipulated  time period in which normally one thousand  answer booklets can be evaluated?” asked the professor.
Controller Examinations, Kashmir University, Abdul Salam Bhat denied that the system of distribution of answer booklets was faulty or scandalous.
“There is a proper mechanism that university follows while distributing papers for evaluation and varsity favours no one,” Bhat said.
We hardly receive the cases where students apply for rechecking or re-evaluation and students marks’ were increased, he said.
When specific cases were pointed out he said, “This year we received 12 applications out of which 8 students’ marks were incremented.  The vice chancellor personally intervened in the matter to ensure no student is deprived of admission to PG classes,” he said.
Bhat said that evaluators are being paid Rs 15 per answer booklet at undergraduate level and Rs 20 at the PG level. Moreover, evaluation of answer sheets is optional.
The evaluator has choice to agree or reject the offer to evaluate the answer sheets.
Assistant Registrar Abdul Khaliq Lone said that evaluator of an answer booklet that was found faulty is out of station. “We will inform him about the case,” he said.
“This is a human error. As soon as the professor arrives we will inform him about this case,” Khaliq told Kashmir Reader.
But, when asked Kashmir University is closing its admission process and given the long process of rectifying the errors the students may lose their one academic year, Khaliq and Bhat both expressed helplessness and said, “We can’t do anything. It is a procedure.”

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